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tv   Full Measure With Sharyl Attkisson  ABC  August 13, 2017 10:00am-10:30am EDT

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nick penniman: it's not only a powerful position, it's a perverse system. in fact, it's the inverse of what we all as citizens should want. sharyl: nick penniman leads the group "issue one." its new report, "the price of power," exposes how members of congress serve as cash cows for their party's political machinery. how much does a committee chairmanship cost? nick: you've got to deliver $1.2 million to the republican national congressional committee. democrats, it's about the same thing. sharyl: it's almost like paying for the
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certain position. nick: it is borderline extortion. scott: abedi grew up in a suburb of manchester, a working class city where neighborhoods can be segregated and young unemployed men congregate, not unlike an area of birmingham where we visited last year. jahan mahmood: i mean, in this area alone, this area at one point had the largest number of terror convictions in the country. scott: your whole goal is to stop them from getting to the point that they actually go overseas? jahan mahmood: absolutely. peter morici: president trump promised a very hard line with china. there's a big trade surplus with the united states. $300 billion a year. at least 200 million american jobs. since then, he has backed down. he swapped trade for north korea when he didn't need to. sharyl: why do you say he didn't need to? peter: china is going to do what it needs to do with regard to north korea out of its own national security interests. ♪ [captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] ♪
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sharyl: welcome to "full measure." i'm sharyl attkisson. today, an exclusive first look at a new report that says you can put a price on success when it comes to congress. the report by "issue one" exposes the secretive money system in which members of congress "buy" top spots on the most powerful committees. to raise the money, they often collect from the very interests their committees are supposed to oversee. our cover story is "the price of power." nick penniman: it's not only a powerful position, it's a perverse system. in fact, it's the inverse of what we all as citizens should want. sharyl: nick penniman leads the group issue one. its new report, "the price of power," exposes how members of congress serve as cash cows for their party's political machinery. the best fundraisers are rewarded with powerful positions that decide the laws affecting
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all of us. insiders report both parties have similar systems of dues that members have to pay every two years by raising money directly for the party. that's called dialing for dollars. and by giving some of their campaign funds to the party and to colleagues facing tough races. how much they raise determines who gets ahead. nick penniman: what we should want is that people rise in stature because of merit, not because of money. and right now, it's money over merit. as an example, ordinary republicans have six-figure party dues. but it takes more to make the ranks of leadership. sharyl: how much does a committee chairmanship cost? nick penniman: if you want to be the chairman of a major committee in congress and you're republican, you've got to deliver $1.2 million to the republican national congressional committee. democrats, it's about the same thing.
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sharyl: it's almost like paying for the privilege of obtaining a certain position. nick penniman: it is borderline extortion. sharyl: it's a far cry from bygone days. in the 1960's, a mere $100 donation could get you not only dinner with congressional candidate shirley temple, but also host bing crosby. today, besides the $1.2 million required of "a" committee chairmen, republicans who chair secondary "b" committees are expected to raise $875,000 in dues. the top republican in the house, as speaker, has to raise $20 million. the number two, majority leader $10 million. such details, held tightly to the vest for years, come from some of the 180 former public officials who belong to issue one's bipartisan "reformers caucus" and say they're sick of money's influence in politics. former congresswoman connie morella. connie morella: i think we have reached crisis proportions when it comes to money.
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a member of congress devotes almost one third of every day to raising money. sharyl: former senate majority leader tom daschle. tom daschle: people leave on thursday. they come back on tuesday and try to govern on wednesday these days and you can't run a country this complicated with the challenges we face and spend so little time doing so. sharyl: former labor secretary bill brock. bill brock: if you tell me the problem of money in politics, the distortions that it creates is just gonna keep getting worse, shoot me. shoot me. zach wamp: it's a flawed system and it's like a nuclear arms race. the democrats do more of it because the republicans do more of it. sharyl: tennessee republican zach wamp co-chairs the reformers caucus. he was in congress from 1995 to 2011. how are the members told how much money that they ought to raise? zach wamp: so, the committees, usually in the spring, and they just did this a month ago.
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they come out with a quota and it basically says that if you're a chairman of a regular committee, it's x dollars, and if you're a chairman of an a committee, an exclusive committee, it's even higher. if there's enough money in your campaign account, you can just cut a check, or, if you don't have enough money, you have to go over in what's called dialing for dollars. you sit in a little booth, they give you a list, you call people that you don't know who don't want you to call them, by the way, and you ask them for money, you tell them we have this spring event coming up, and maybe president trump is going to be there, and will you please dedicate $10,000 or $25,000 or $50,000 to this dinner and they keep a total of it, and you see people advance to committee chairmanships and into leadership, based on how much time they spend during the workday, taxpayer expense, making calls, shaking down the special interests. sharyl: with all that pressure to raise money, sometimes these committee members are raising it from the interest they're supposed to regulate, true? zach wamp: wl,
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they, they actually intentionally give you those lists of people that have something to do with your committees, because they know that they're the ones that are most likely to say yes. sharyl: doesn't that pervert the system by which the members of these committees become beholden to the very people that they're supposed to regulate or oversee? zach wamp: of course, yes. sharyl: for example, the house financial services committee oversees matters involving everything from wall street and insurance to the stock exchanges. nick penniman: the big joke in washington is that the financial services committee is called the cash committee. not because it deals with finances, but because just being on it allows you to raise so much money from bank lobbyists and bankers that it's like an atm machine. the cash just pours in. sharyl: on the heels of the mortgage crisis, as the financial services committee considered new regulations on banking and real estate, money poured in from those industries.
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from 2009 to 2016, the republican chairman of the committee, jeb hensarling, raised $10.1 million, half of it from finance, insurance, and real estate interests. he transferred $8.6 million of it to the national republican campaign committee and other house republicans. the committee's lead democrat, maxine waters, raised $3.7 million, one quarter of it from finance, insurance, and real estate donors. she transferred about $798,000 of that to the democratic congressional campaign committee and other house democrats. hensarling and waters didn't respond to our requests for comment. if there are members on the financial services committee and they're having to raise that much money, and they're taking it from the banks they regulate, who's going to have the leg up when it comes to the kinds of laws that they support?
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nick penniman: the kind of sad joke in washington is you lean towards the green. and when you're on the financial services committee, let's say, and most of your money or a big chunk of your money's coming from bank lobbyists that you're supposed to be regulating, unfortunately, you're probably going to lean more towards what they want. the democratic congressional campaign committee and national republican campaign committee didn't respond to our repeated requests for interviews and comment. zach wamp: the system is so bad that the members hate it. members of congress hate to do it. the people they're calling hate to be called. sharyl: what happens if they buck it? if someone says, i'm not going to raise this money? zach wamp: you won't advance and they'll put their thumb down on you, they even ridicule you publicly at the meetings. this person is not making the calls. they're not raising the money. sharyl: so, while they might rather be taking care of the people's business, many spend countless hours catering to the interests that will help them pay their party dues. zach wamp: and i hate to use this word, but it makes prostitutes out of our elected officials. when the leadership says, if you want to advance, you have to demean yourself and go over there at taxpayer time and make
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phone calls to people that don't even want to talk to you, asking them for money for your party so that you can somehow advance the the calls of good government, it really needs to change and it's going to take the country, because i can tell you, they're not going to change it because they're stuck in the system and they're proliferating against each other, the two parties. sharyl: issue one says a simple solution that could be done immediately would be for the house to change its rules to say that fundraising cannot be taken into account when choosing committee members. no such plan is on the table. ahead on "full measure." british authorities are looking for terrorists within their cities. scott thuman visits one city that has seen the threat and is trying to do something about it.
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sharyl: the may terrorist attack in manchester revived the ongoing concern about terrorists living and plotting in our very midst. in britain, france, belgium, and in the united states, after each attack, the question is -- when and how did the attackers become radicalized? last year, scott thuman travelled to birmingham, england, a working class city similar to manchester, where one man decided to do something about radicalization. chief ian hopkins: i can confirm that the man suspected of carrying out last night's atrocity is 22-year-old salman abedi. scott: abedi grew up in a suburb of manchester, a working class city where neighborhoods can be
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men congregate -- not unlike an area of birmingham, where we visited last year. jahan mahmood: this area right here. that's where i used to run a soccer club. scott: follow jahan mahmood long enough and you are bound to find yourself in what, over the years, has been a breeding ground of aspiring terrorists. jahan: the population here is predominantly muslim, more than 80%. they tend to come from areas of pakistan and kashmir. scott: on this day, he takes us through birmingham, a couple hours hour north of london and where the former military history professor does most of his work trying to "de-radicalize" young men. jahan: i mean, in this area alone, this area at one point had the largest number of terrorist convictions in the country. scott: your whole goal is to stop them from getting to the point that they actually go overseas? jahan: absolutely. scott: you feel you're being successful? jahan: well, the people i do know of who i've stopped is seven. scott: like this 26-year-old, who to prote
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cameron: basically when it all kicked off after september 11th. scott: and you wanted to get to the battlefield? cameron: i wanted to get to the battlefield. that was the main aim. scott: to fight back -- to kill british, to kill americans? cameron: of course, yeah, if that's what it would have taken, yeah. scott: that's what jahan is trying to temper. he says in this area where signs are often in urdu and arabic voices are heard on soccer fields, roughly 40% of those living here are under 18. they are impressionable, easy targets for isis recruiters. he recalls one instance involving a handful of teens. jahan: he was watching -- he had actually on his phone -- he had downloaded the beheading of ken bigley, who was a british contractor in iraq, and i was shocked to see these young men, a number of them, huddled around watching and laughing. scott: "the guardian" newspaper claims 800 britons left the country last summer alone to fight with
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just a week after our visit, four more alleged terrorists were arrested, two in this neighborhood. who did you want to fight with? cameron: it was obviously against the west. you know, because we felt like they were destroying people's lives. scott: you were angry at america? cameron: yeah, obviously, and the u.k., as well. scott: do you hear a lot of that, do you hear a lot of that anti-american sentiment? jahan: i hear it a lot. i mean, i have to be honest with you, is that i hear a lot of it absolutely and it's all based on conflicts in afghanistan, iraq, and syria. scott: to counter that through meetings sometimes organized at a local mosque, or at this old pool hall, jahan shows them sobering graphic pictures of jihadists killed in battle, an example of what might come of them, and he points out, that the terrorists often kill innocent muslims. that was a bit of a turning point for you, when you realized that muslims were also a target of the terrorists?
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it did make me think, whoa, why would i go out there? it would be stupid of me to go out there. scott: jahan says winning over even one potential jihadist can have an incalculable effect. jahan: here's a conversation i remember. here's your car keys. would you really hand them over to a local person? would you really do that? and yet, you're handing your life over to someone on the internet that you've never met before. why would you do that? scott: but there's no perfect formula for "de-radicalizing" and jahan could use all the allies he can get. imams, he says, are often falling short. jahan: i do feel that religious leaders have failed in their religious duty to try and make their communities safer and they've not been able to engage properly. scott: it is gaining the upper hand of controlling the message that will be essential to turning the tide of radicalization in britain, in europe, and in the united
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the wins will be measured by individuals like cameron. he's now 26 with a job, a wife, a child, and a future -- one he was on the brink of gambling away. you look back now and you think that you would have just been a number? cameron: yeah, definitely. i would have been a number and i would have been deleted at any time. scott: there's a parallel here. while investigators in manchester have made multiple arrests by following leads to see who helped abedi plot that concert attack, that's exactly what jahan does in trying to prevent attacks. so he is finding out who is recruiting or influencing the young men he's counseling, he tries to de-radicalize them as well. sharyl: thanks, scott. coming up on "full measure." president trump's approach to china has changed since the hard
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>> today at 10:30, is the trump administration purging the infr sharyl: president trump's america first promise in his campaign is coming in second to the geopolitics of the real world.
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hit a wall when it came up against the prospects of a nuclear-armed aggressor. we recently spoke with peter morici, who was chief economist at the u.s. international trade commission and is now a professor at the university of maryland. what was president trump's campaign stance on working with china and his vision of what we ought to do versus what you see happening now? prof. morici: president trump promised a very hard line with china. there's a big trade surplus with the united states. $300 billion a year. at least 200 million american jobs. since then, he has backed down. what happened was he basically got focused on north korea and he swapped north korea for trade when he didn't need to. sharyl: why do you say he didn't need to? prof. morici: china is going to do what it needs to do out with regard to north korea out of its own national security interests. to the extent that north korea is a threat, it will take what steps are necessary. trump did enough by threatening to act unilaterally if other
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assist him to get china to act. he didn't have to throw in trade as well, because the last thing the chinese want is the americans going into north korea, even if it's just bombing and so forth, because they are quite concerned about millions of north koreans fleeing across the border into china. they want stability in the region. this would upset the equilibrium and so forth. sharyl: former treasury secretary henry paulson praised china for quote "stepping up to keep globalization going forward." what do you think about that? prof. morici: i think secretary paulson is wrong. he's behaving like a typical new york investment banker, in that he sees opportunities to make loans and finance the silk road and all the rest. sharyl: the silk road refers to a plan china called "one belt, one road," the country's vast investment in shipping and transport to develop both a trade route and markets reaching from malaysia to europe. china seems to really be emerging as the global leader in many ways. there's a recent meeting attended by the philippines, ss
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argentina, many of them are getting billions in infrastructure investment from china. what does this say to you? prof. morici: well, the chinese have effectively used the money they have earned on trade to do two things, one is to build up their next level of industries, they are moving what into what they call indigenous technologies, namely going after our high tech sector. they're not just going to assemble our cell phones anymore, they are going to design the next generation of consumer products and sell them here. then where is microsoft? and they are turning it into a great foreign policy initiative. eurasia really does need a modernization of its east-west infrastructure, building better ports, air facilities, railroads, and so forth. and china is in position to finance that. this is the largest capital project since the marshall plan. nationr before has one carried a gr
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of peace. sharyl: the marshall plan was the u.s. initiative to help pay and to rebuild europe after world war ii, named for secretary of state george marshall. if we were to go in the direction of "america first," would that cause the united states to really lose global market opportunities and fall behind? prof. morici: if you are going to hardball people and bully smaller rivals and so forth, i think it really weakens american leadership. the only way you can fix the trouble spots in the world is if you have the support of your allies. sharyl: what do you think changes because president trump did not follow through on his promises the way he stated them? prof. morici: what sadly doesn't change is not a lot changes. we will continue to have a large trade deficit. when it comes down to it, donald trump didn't stand up to china. he let down those workers that voted for him, and i think he's going to be a one-term president because of it. and if he is, i think he is getting everything he deserves, this was his signature issue and he really shouldn't have backed away from it.
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sharyl: the president has taken at least one stand against china. u.s. warships have tested the chinese claim that the islands in the south china sea, sailing within 12 miles, that showing beijing the fios is not cable. we're a 100% fiber optic network. and with the new fios gigabit connection... you get our fastest... internet ever. with download speeds up to 940 megs - 20 times faster than most people have. switch to fios gigabit connection with tv and phone for $79.99 a month online for the first year. plus hbo for one year and multi-room dvr service for two years, all with a two-year agreement. and switching has never been easier. get out of your contract with up to a $500 credit to help cover your early termination fee. go to fiosgigabit.com
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did you know slow internet can actually hold your business back? say goodbye to slow downloads, slow backups, slow everything. comcast business offers blazing fast and reliable internet that's up to 16 times faster than slow internet from the phone company. say hello to faster downloads with internet speeds up to 250 megabits per second. get fast internet and add phone and tv now for only $24.90 more per month. our lowest price ever on this offer. but only for a limited time. call today. comcast business. built for business. sharyl: in "follow the money," the irs is allowing huge sums of your tax dollars to be fraudulently paid to illegal immigrants, acrd
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federal law bars illegal immigrants from receiving public benefits. but the ig says the irs is refusing to require people to have a social security number to collect the additional child tax credit. the ig says that gives an incentive for widespread fraud. in 2001, people without social security numbers collected $62 million in additional child tax credit refunds. in 2005, that number jumped to $924 million. in 2015, it reached $3.4 billion. at a recent hearing, irs commissioner john koskinen told congress the agency is cracking down on all kinds of fraud. comm. koskinen: the new requirement to hold earned income tax credit, child tax credit returns, and another change enacted by congress to accelerate the filing date of forms w2, together have helped the irs spot incorrect or fraudulent returns. sharyl: this week, chairman of the homeland security committee ron johnson sent a letter asking the treasury department "review the irs's refusal to prevent fraudulent overpayme
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next week, an update on our investigation into a baffling illness responsible for nightmarish scenarios. the disease mimics one of the world's most feared illnesses, polio. millions of people had been infected with this ev-d68, but a relatively few actually come down with the paralysis. do we have any idea why those certain children get paralyzed? dr. benjamin greenberg: we don't know that yet, but it's worth noting that that phenomenon, that the same virus can infect thousands, hundreds of thousands, or even millions of people with only a few individuals having catastrophic events from the virus is true for almost every virus in human biology. sharyl: cdc gave the mysterious paralysis a new name, acute flaccid myelitis, or afm. and more kids have been hurt seriously in the past few years in the u.s. than measles, ebola, and zika combined. th'
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until then, thanks for watching. we will be searching for more stories that hold powers accountable.
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fios is not cable. we're a 100% fiber optic network. and with the new fios gigabit connection... you get our fastest internet ever. with download speeds up to 940 megs - 20 times faster than most people have. switch to fios gigabit connection with tv and phone for $79.99 a month online for the first year. plus hbo for one year and multi-room dvr service for two years, all with a two-year agreement. and switching has never been easier. get out of you contract with up to a $500 credit to help cover your early termination fee. go to fiosgigabit.com
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from washington d.c. and around the world, this is "government matters" with francis rose. >> thanks for watching the weekend edition of government matters. the only show covering the latest news, trends, and topics that matter to the business of government. >> i'm your host francis rose. >> two federal chief officers left their positions this week after the departure of two others. -- david announced he was leaving the office of personnel management. they came on the heels of -- leaving

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